Tag Archives: Pitching and Presenting

Questions, often without warning

Q: “Sniper Control” How do we handle those questions or statements that come at anytime often without warning in our meeting?

1 Apply the advice in ‘Handling Q&A’ and ask the person a question back, for example “Before I answer, what is behind your question?”  Questions give you control.

2 Ensure you have accommodated all the political opinions in the room and if you think a question will arise that will stump you, ask a colleague for advice before you leave for the meeting.

Q: Presenting without PowerPoint, Can we?    A: Yes, especially with creative ideas. Perhaps you can demonstrate what it is you wish to sell or create the idea in front of the meeting on a flip chart? Better still get them to build alongside you – bring a pad of paper and marker pens to the meeting (No batteries, Windows updates or power cables are needed for these techniques)

When you HAVE to use someone else’s presentation!

Great advice from Nicholas Bate 

11 Ways to Improve an ‘Assigned’ Presentation

Posted: 14 Aug 2016 12:16 AM PDT

You’ve been given a slide deck and told ‘deliver this’. But it’s pretty awful.

  1. Run through it a couple of times on your own. What’s its natural timing? Where is it awful/clunky/boring?
  2. Replace a slide or two with a story.
  3. Replace a slide or two with a picture.
  4. Replace a slide or two with an interactive exercise.
  5. Now create a powerful start: maybe some startling figures which reveal the depth of the problem.
  6. Now ensure there is a Q&A before
  7. Your powerful summary and
  8. Your call to action: what is it you want the audience to do differently having invested this time with you?
  9. Now read this and this
  10. Repeat 2. Adjust. Deliver. Learn.

Say it in 7: Develop the Game Plan

The Say it in 7 approach to structuring your pitch, story or proposal starts with the client/customer’s pressing challenge and ends on actionSay it in 7 is the methodology to create a pitch/proposal/idea and present it in 7 slides.

In 7 slides we can communicate ‘why our solution’ and back it with evidence that is appropriate to the people who will make the decision.

With fewer slides, each slide has to work harder.

With fewer slides, there is more opportunity for the customer to fill in the blanks with Q&A

Next Steps: The last slide (slide 7) asks for action. We want to get a ‘yes’ rather than a ‘maybe’.

 

FOOTNOTE : Great to be working with Talking Rugby Union the place for all the latest rugby news, photo, videos The Rugby Championship, 7s and Leagues from around the world. In the run up to Rio Rugby 7s A series of articles shows how the world of sport and business are in sync when running a pitch or running on to one!

STORY THOUGHT . . . And the reason is . . .

The reason is . . .Practise using the phrase “the reason why this is so important, “or applicable, “or relevant”. Incorporate this component of your story, in every meeting.

This will give people a reason to buy into your story.

More story tips to follow.

http://www.sayitin7.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=557&action=edit#edit_timestamp

Consistency in New Business

One of the publishing delights this year was Pensieri by Nicholas Bate http://nicholasbate.typepad.com As with all his books I devour the contents and see the thinking in the context of new business. This page about being consistent struck home especially because people who win a lot of new business are totally consistent.

Scan 55

Nicholas’ books are on Amazon and there is a lot of inspiratioScan 54nal pieces free on his website.

 

 

You aren’t using enough rituals.

A great piece via info@hereforth.com and by Eric Barker at TIME   This excellent article prompts thoughts about using rituals to win new business! © 2015 Time Inc. All rights reserved.

So, below are ideas for NB ritual questions/notes to self

BEFORE your meeting Objectives clearly established? Clear understanding of the Client’s agenda? Anticipation of likely push back from Client’s end?

DURING your meeting  Is the idea, proposal and conversation really tailored to the Client’s agenda? Was the story clear? Was the story persuasive? Were the questions well handled? Did the meeting finish with clear actions and next steps?

Another good ritual? Read all about emerging technologies sensibly applied at http://www.hereforth.com  Once a week the hereforth newsletter appears and is quite brilliant