Author Archives: Tim Baynes

The Ten Truths

This is a presentation and conversation that I have had with a number of clients across the years. I am dusting it off and bringing it back into the foreground for 2018. Some of the points are obvious yet the obvious gets overlooked in the  heat of battle.

Some of the points are provocative and provocation is sometime the only way to win.

Here is your link to the PDF

If you want to discuss any of the ideas here to turn the whole piece into a team game or seminar let me know and we can easily arrange to make it so.

Questions, often without warning

Q: “Sniper Control” How do we handle those questions or statements that come at anytime often without warning in our meeting?

1 Apply the advice in ‘Handling Q&A’ and ask the person a question back, for example “Before I answer, what is behind your question?”  Questions give you control.

2 Ensure you have accommodated all the political opinions in the room and if you think a question will arise that will stump you, ask a colleague for advice before you leave for the meeting.

Q: Presenting without PowerPoint, Can we?    A: Yes, especially with creative ideas. Perhaps you can demonstrate what it is you wish to sell or create the idea in front of the meeting on a flip chart? Better still get them to build alongside you – bring a pad of paper and marker pens to the meeting (No batteries, Windows updates or power cables are needed for these techniques)

When you HAVE to use someone else’s presentation!

Great advice from Nicholas Bate 

11 Ways to Improve an ‘Assigned’ Presentation

Posted: 14 Aug 2016 12:16 AM PDT

You’ve been given a slide deck and told ‘deliver this’. But it’s pretty awful.

  1. Run through it a couple of times on your own. What’s its natural timing? Where is it awful/clunky/boring?
  2. Replace a slide or two with a story.
  3. Replace a slide or two with a picture.
  4. Replace a slide or two with an interactive exercise.
  5. Now create a powerful start: maybe some startling figures which reveal the depth of the problem.
  6. Now ensure there is a Q&A before
  7. Your powerful summary and
  8. Your call to action: what is it you want the audience to do differently having invested this time with you?
  9. Now read this and this
  10. Repeat 2. Adjust. Deliver. Learn.

Say it in 7: Develop the Game Plan

The Say it in 7 approach to structuring your pitch, story or proposal starts with the client/customer’s pressing challenge and ends on actionSay it in 7 is the methodology to create a pitch/proposal/idea and present it in 7 slides.

In 7 slides we can communicate ‘why our solution’ and back it with evidence that is appropriate to the people who will make the decision.

With fewer slides, each slide has to work harder.

With fewer slides, there is more opportunity for the customer to fill in the blanks with Q&A

Next Steps: The last slide (slide 7) asks for action. We want to get a ‘yes’ rather than a ‘maybe’.

 

FOOTNOTE : Great to be working with Talking Rugby Union the place for all the latest rugby news, photo, videos The Rugby Championship, 7s and Leagues from around the world. In the run up to Rio Rugby 7s A series of articles shows how the world of sport and business are in sync when running a pitch or running on to one!

Say it in 7 – Realising Ambition

Another exciting piece on the Talking Rugby Union site, extract:

Say it in 7 founder Tim Baynes uses a pitch scenario to describe how best to showcase your skills to gain the desired result: To win must consider these three points, and they will take you along the road to success.

– See more at http://www.talkingrugbyunion.co.uk/say-it-in-7-realising-ambition/15891.htm#sthash.lwXHQhTG.dpuf