Category Archives: Story Telling

9 lessons in communication for Medical Consultants

Watching them at work and taking notes

I was in hospital in South Wales, the Morriston Coronary Care Unit undergoing a series of tests and observations across 11 days.

I returned home fitter and more ease.

Watching, each day, the consultants on my ward communicate to colleagues and patients was remarkable opportunity to see and hear some of the most professional people on this planet.

In fact very nurse, every doctor and every other person on the wards who contribute so much, was a remarkable experience.

7 things we can learn from Nurses

Watching and taking notes of these wonderful people

This August I was in hospital in South Wales: Morriston Coronary Care Unit undergoing a series of tests and observations across 11 days.

Aside from returning home fitter and more at ease, that time was a remarkable opportunity to see and hear some of the most professional people on this planet.

Every nurse, every doctor and every other person on the wards, who contribute so much, was a complete delight.

TB September 2018

Reading to forget – Questioning to remember

William Cho’s article in Medium makes some telling points about recalling and applying what we read. The same points can be made about TRAINING!

As the training guy helping people to pitch their business ideas. His points about learning through questions, piece by piece is a BIG message for those like me who deliver training:  How can we turn our magic into summarised questions at the end of a module or a day’s session so the delegates in our program really get it!

 

Thank you William

When you HAVE to use someone else’s presentation!

Great advice from Nicholas Bate 

11 Ways to Improve an ‘Assigned’ Presentation

Posted: 14 Aug 2016 12:16 AM PDT

You’ve been given a slide deck and told ‘deliver this’. But it’s pretty awful.

  1. Run through it a couple of times on your own. What’s its natural timing? Where is it awful/clunky/boring?
  2. Replace a slide or two with a story.
  3. Replace a slide or two with a picture.
  4. Replace a slide or two with an interactive exercise.
  5. Now create a powerful start: maybe some startling figures which reveal the depth of the problem.
  6. Now ensure there is a Q&A before
  7. Your powerful summary and
  8. Your call to action: what is it you want the audience to do differently having invested this time with you?
  9. Now read this and this
  10. Repeat 2. Adjust. Deliver. Learn.